Archives for posts with tag: Sauce

It's behind the ceviche!

Another great vegetable side dish for a BBQ. This is more of a summer recipe, so keep it in mind as you’re doing all your ab work to get a ROCKIN beach body! I made this dish along with Peruvian Ceviche and Raw Pear and Blackberry Tart.

When grilling the vegetables remember a few things:

  • charring food is bad. The charred portion becomes carcinogenic (cancer-causing) in our bodies. Try to keep flare-ups to a minimum and keep those “grill marks” light.
  • along the same lines it’s better to use a higher heat oil when grilling. Olive oil and other medium-low heat oils will oxidize and change chemical structure in high heat… making them unsuitable for our bodies. Coconut oil can drip into the grill and cause flare-ups sometimes, so I used grapeseed oil in this recipe.  

    Geoff says "Grill Safely or else!"

Grilled Vegetables with Salsa Verde

 1 eggplant, sliced lengthwise into 3/4″ strips
2 bell peppers
3-4 zucchini, sliced lengthwise same as eggplant

  1. Heat grill to medium high.
  2. Place whole bell peppers on the grill, turn occasionally until skin is slightly blistering and soft.
  3. Brush zucchini and eggplant slices with some grapeseed oil and dust with pepper and salt.
  4. Grill slices until soft with slight grill marks
  5. Remove bell peppers when ready. Cool in cold water and remove skin and seeds.
  6. Slice bell pepper into strips like the eggplant and zucchini.
  7. Serve on a platter with Salsa Verde

Salsa Verde

1 avocado
1/2 c. cilantro leaves
1/2 c. parsley leaves
1/2 c. olive oil
1 Tbsp. minced ginger
Juice from a half of lemon
2-3 garlic cloves
1 tsp. salt
sprinkle of paprika

  1. In a blender or small food processor chop garlic and ginger
  2. Add parsley and cilantro and chop until well combined. Scrape down the sides with a spatula when necessary
  3. Add remaining ingredients and season to taste
  4. Serve sauce over grilled vegetables or on the side.
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Layers of Vegetables

Made this beauty for Thanksgiving. It was a hit! Creamy and delicious and FILLING. Use a mandoline slicer or attachment on a food processor if you don’t want to spend the whole day thinly slicing. Other than that, this recipe is a breeze.

Rutabaga, Green Apple, and Butternut Gratin with MacCashew Cream Sauce

Ingredients:

Gratins
5-6 rutabaga, peeled and thinly sliced
4 granny smith apples, cored and thinly sliced 
1 butternut squash, peeled and thinly sliced
1 red onion, thinly sliced
1 tbsp coconut sugar (optional)
1/4 cup fresh thyme, roughly chopped
1/2 cup cold-pressed coconut oil, warmed to liquid
Fresh ground black pepper
Fine ground sea salt

Cream Sauce
1/4 cup macadamia nuts, not soaked
1/2 cup cashews, soaked for 4 hours
1 cup water
1/4 tsp salt

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
2. On low/medium heat, slowly sauté red onion with sugar and a tbsp. of coconut oil until onions are brown and caramelized (be patient and careful not to burn.) About 10-15 min.
3. Oil a casserole dish and begin to layer the vegetable slices:
Rutabaga: brush coconut oil, fresh thyme, tiny pinch salt/pepper
Apple: brush coconut oil, tiny pinch salt/pepper
Onion
Butternut squash: brush coconut oil, tiny pinch salt/pepper
4. Whatever layer you finish on, top with a little more salt and pepper as well as some thyme. 
5. Bake for 45 mins. 
6. Make cream sauce while the gratin bakes. Drain cashews from soaking liquid and rinse. Place all ingredients in a high powered blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Pour over gratin when done. 
recipe adapted from : Yum Universe

This recipe was a complete accident… something that happens more often than not, actually.

I work for a family and cook for them every night and the other day I found myself standing in front of the refrigerator trying to decide how to use the random ingredients available to me. The pesto burger stack was born. Being the Paleo Chef that I am, I was not about to try to wrap this burger in a bun but I wanted this dish to have a sense of completeness that is often lacking when you put a burger patty on a plate with a side of whatever. By grilling the butternut rounds with the burgers I created a harmonious visual presentation as well as a protein/starch element that helps the dish have some complexity. And let me say, the mixture of the sweet squash with the salty pesto is heavenly.

The Stack

Pesto Burger Stack

Pesto

3 c. fresh basil leaves

2-3 cloves garlic

¼ c. walnuts

¼ c. parmesan cheese

½ c. olive oil

1 tsp. salt

Stack

                1 butternut squash, peeled and cut into rounds

                1 lb. grass-fed ground beef

                1 small red onion, minced

                1-2 cloves of garlic, minced

Directions

  1. In a blender or food processor, add all pesto ingredients and puree until desired consistency, taste to adjust for more salt, garlic, or basil flavor as you desire.
  2. In a bowl, mix together red onion, beef, and garlic.
  3. Shape into patties about the same size as the butternut rounds.
  4. Oil the butternut rounds and put on a preheated grill on medium heat. About 5-10 min. each side depending on thickness. Test done-ness with a fork.
  5. Grill the burgers, about 5 min. each side on medium heat 
  6. Once the squash and burgers are done, arrange stacks on a plate. Squash on the plate, then spread pesto on squash and top with burger.  

 Option: top burger stack with some shaved parmesan.

I absolutely love ethnic food. Latin American, Japanese, Ethiopian, Thai, Cameroonian, etc. These cuisines all have exotic and distinct flavors, ties to cultural and social norms, as well as vibrant history of healing and fueling their people. Oftentimes, when shopping or eating out, I find that ethnic food is also the most clean, unprocessed and health supportive. Unfortunately, many ethnic markets, restaurants, and homes have been polluted by American food standards and western dietary influence. Japanese food in the States is a faint resemblance to the wholesome meals of Okinawa. A trip to Buca di Beppo, aka “Italian food”, is a far cry from the pure wholefoods found in the hills of Tuscany. I am increasingly appalled as I venture into Asian, Latin, and Middle Eastern markets here in Los Angeles and find products laden with hydrogenated oil, high fructose corn syrup, MSG, and many other “food-like” substances. Sugar is added to everything from coconut milk to sauces. Wheat and corn derivatives are in all kinds of marinades, nothing is organic, everything is refined.

In order to get “back to the beginning” of human eating we need to take a second look at these places and their historical culinary traditions so that we may shed light on where they began to fall away from their original design. I’ve found that the best way to get some really good, unadulterated ethnic meals is, 1. Go to the country of origin and find a family and let them cook for you– or– 2. Make it yourself.

Since I’ve recently been dubbed “Chef Nikki”, I suppose option number 2 is certainly within my reach. Thus, the following recipe.

It is a venture into fusion cooking (a venture I travel all too often). It combines the goodness of American comfort food with the celebration of flavors from Mexico. All the while, remaining Paleo compliant and friendly to all the gluten and lac-tarded people out there.

Meatloaf with Almond and Ancho Mole

The Loaf

Turkey Meatloaf and Ancho Mole Sauce

Meatloaf

1 lb. organic, wild, or kosher ground turkey

1/2 head large cauliflower, chopped finely into “rice”

6-7 shiitake mushrooms, chopped finely

1/2 medium white onion, chopped finely

3  garlic cloves, minced

salt and pepper

1 1/2  c. Almond and Ancho Mole sauce, reserve remaining sauce for finished loaf.

1. Preheat oven to 375

2. Mix all ingredients in a large bowl  and press into a greased loaf pan.

3. Bake 30 mins and then cover. Bake an additional 30 mins or until middle is done.

4. Let it set/cool for 10-20 mins. Serve with remaining sauce.

Almond and Ancho Mole Sauce

1 c. whole almonds (blanched)

2 medium dried ancho chilis (seeds and stems discarded)

2 c. vegetable stock

1 medium tomato (quartered and seeded)

1/2 medium white onion (use the other half of the meatloaf onion)

2 Tbsp. raisins

2 -3 medium cloves of garlic

1/4 tsp sea salt

1/2 tsp. anise

1/2 tsp. coriander

4 allspice berries, crushed

1 Tbsp. cooking fat (rendered fat, coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or ghee)

1 . Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. `Spread the almonds out on a dry baking sheet. Bake for 15-20 mins, stirring once or twice until almonds are light tan.

toasting the almonds

2. Heat a dry heavy bottom skillet or cast iron griddle and tear the ancho chilis into large pieces. Toast for 1-2 mins occassionally pressing down on them with a spatula. They should blister and begin to lighten in color. Be careful not to inhale the fumes.

3. In a blender, puree chilis, almonds, stock, tomato, onion, raisins, garlic and salt.

4. Add ground spices into the blender and puree thoroughly. You may add some stock if its too thick to blend.

5. Add the cooking fat to a heated skillet and add the sauce, reduce until desired consistency. Use immediately or cool and refrigerate.