Archives for posts with tag: Produce

Wedding gifts are amazing.

A cast iron dutch oven is a prime example of why wedding gifts are amazing.

O Great Bearded One... or Colin.

So, here’s a quick shout out to our friend Colin who purchased said item in honor of our nuptials! Putting it to use was simple enough. I set out to create a delicious Paleo-fied Shepherd’s Pie. Below are the fruits (or pie) of my labor.

This particular pie was topped with a kabocha squash mash, but you could use any squash (or yam) you have on hand.

Kabocha Shepherd’s Pie

1 1/2 lbs. grass-fed ground beef
1 c. diced eggplant
1/2 bell pepper, diced
3 celery ribs, chopped
1/2 onion, diced
2 shiitake mushrooms, diced
4 whole, peeled tomatoes, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp. cumin
2 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. pepper
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. oregano
pinch cayenne

Topping

1/2 onion, caramelized
1 large kabocha squash (about 3 cups of flesh)

  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Caramelize onions by slicing thin half moons and cooking on LOW heat for 20 mins or until onions are soft and brown (not brown and crispy). Stir occasionally
  3.  Cut squash in half and take out the seeds. Place face down on a baking sheet and roast for 20-25 mins. Done when skin gives easily when pressed.
  4. Let the squash cool and then scoop out flesh into a food processor.

    mash it up!

  5. Add caramelized onions and some salt and pepper to taste. Blend until smooth and set aside.
  6. Lower oven temp to 300.
  7. In a cast iron dutch oven or large skillet over medium heat,  saute onion, celery, and mushrooms for 2-3 min. Add beef.

    celery, pepper, and eggplant

  8. Stir until beef begins to brown.
  9. Add bell pepper, eggplant, tomatoes, garlic, and spices.
  10. Heat until beef is cooked through and vegetables are beginning to get soft.

    gettin steamy

  11. Spread topping over the top of the meat mixture in the dutch oven. If using a baking pan, transfer meat mixture to baking pan first, then spread the topping on the meat.

    Rustic

  12. Bake for 20 mins or until squash topping begins to brown.

It's behind the ceviche!

Another great vegetable side dish for a BBQ. This is more of a summer recipe, so keep it in mind as you’re doing all your ab work to get a ROCKIN beach body! I made this dish along with Peruvian Ceviche and Raw Pear and Blackberry Tart.

When grilling the vegetables remember a few things:

  • charring food is bad. The charred portion becomes carcinogenic (cancer-causing) in our bodies. Try to keep flare-ups to a minimum and keep those “grill marks” light.
  • along the same lines it’s better to use a higher heat oil when grilling. Olive oil and other medium-low heat oils will oxidize and change chemical structure in high heat… making them unsuitable for our bodies. Coconut oil can drip into the grill and cause flare-ups sometimes, so I used grapeseed oil in this recipe.  

    Geoff says "Grill Safely or else!"

Grilled Vegetables with Salsa Verde

 1 eggplant, sliced lengthwise into 3/4″ strips
2 bell peppers
3-4 zucchini, sliced lengthwise same as eggplant

  1. Heat grill to medium high.
  2. Place whole bell peppers on the grill, turn occasionally until skin is slightly blistering and soft.
  3. Brush zucchini and eggplant slices with some grapeseed oil and dust with pepper and salt.
  4. Grill slices until soft with slight grill marks
  5. Remove bell peppers when ready. Cool in cold water and remove skin and seeds.
  6. Slice bell pepper into strips like the eggplant and zucchini.
  7. Serve on a platter with Salsa Verde

Salsa Verde

1 avocado
1/2 c. cilantro leaves
1/2 c. parsley leaves
1/2 c. olive oil
1 Tbsp. minced ginger
Juice from a half of lemon
2-3 garlic cloves
1 tsp. salt
sprinkle of paprika

  1. In a blender or small food processor chop garlic and ginger
  2. Add parsley and cilantro and chop until well combined. Scrape down the sides with a spatula when necessary
  3. Add remaining ingredients and season to taste
  4. Serve sauce over grilled vegetables or on the side.

Just a quick little breakfast item.

I like frittatas for multiple reasons:

  1. You can load them with things like meat and veggies.
  2. They are great as leftovers for when you don’t have anytime to cook but you need a quick snack that’s paleo-friendly
  3. You don’t have to flip it like an omlette.

This one started with some caramelized onions and sautéed mushrooms. I used frozen spinach and all natural, nitrate/nitrite free bacon. My cast iron was small so I only used 6 eggs, so if you have a bigger pan, use more.

Bacon, Mushroom, and Spinach Frittata

1/2 lb. bacon
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
6 crimini mushrooms, sliced
1 c. frozen spinach, thawed and drained
6 eggs
sea salt and pepper to taste
grass-fed butter or bacon grease to oil pan
OPTIONAL: some organic, grass-fed cheddar to top. and avocado

  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. Over medium heat, with some butter begin to caramelized the onions with  the mushrooms until soft.
  3. You may cook the bacon in the same pan or a different one depending on your preference. (I combined  to limit my pan usage). Once cooked, turn off heat and set aside.

    Bacon, onions, and mushrooms

  4. In a medium bowl, whip eggs with some salt and pepper
  5. In a cast iron or oven safe skillet, heat butter over medium heat . Add egg, then spinach and bacon mixture.
  6. Cook over heat for a while until the egg looks half cooked and half runny.

    Pre-oven frittata

  7. Put the skillet in the oven to bake for about 30 mins or until the middle of the frittata is set. To check, just give the pan a shake and its done when it won’t “jiggle” anymore.

Out of the Oven

South Central Farmer's Cooperative

What:

Community Supported Agriculture is a way in which urban dwellers (like me) can buy fresh organic produce and support local farms by way of a weekly or monthly vegetable box subscription. In short, you order a CSA box from a local supplier and they deliver fresh, local, seasonal produce to a predetermined drop off location.

Why:

Investing in a CSA is a positive step for everyone involved. The subscriber receives fresh food weekly. The farmer has a consumer base close to home. This food is locally sourced (minimizing the environmental impact of purchasing produce that has been driven, flown, or shipped nationally or internationally), organically grown (ensuring a pesticide free meal), and seasonal, which is a pretty big deal if you profess any allegiance to natural, primal, paleo, clean, eco-friendly eating. Yes, it would be AMAZING if everyone could grow their own organic vegetables on the homestead… but let’s be real. Most urban dwellers are not agriculturally inclined. CSA’s make it possible to help close the gap between grower and consumer. It’s no secret that this gap is vast in many American homes, but hopefully if CSA cooperatives, farmer’s markets, and community gardens gain popularity, the dividing wall  between urban life and farm life will start to crumble.

Where:

South Central Farmer’s Cooperative

http://www.southcentralfarmers.com/scfcoop/shop/

http://www.localharvest.org/csa/M23484

My Box

Delivery Locations include (check website for full list) :

  • Eagle Rock Farmer’s Market
  • Whole Foods Market on Arroyo Parkway
  • Knox Presbyterian Church in Pasadena
  • South Pasadena Farmer’s Market

Price:

Sliding Scale starting from $20/week box (will feed a single/couple for 2 weeks or 4 people for 1 week)

Check it out!