Archives for posts with tag: Coconut Oil

A delicious treat! Nuts optional.

This is an amazing recipe for those who want a “sweet” treat without completely derailing their sugar detox/cleanse/general avoidance. The combination of sweet potato or yam, spices, and coconut creates a really savory and finger-licking taste. No guilt involved, I promise. Even more, when you freeze these puppies, it’s almost like a little open faced ice cream sandwich! Say WHAAAT!? yup. Muy delicioso. So have fun with it… play with the spices, and while you’re at it, play with the filling too! It could be garnet yam, sweet potato, kabocha squash, okinowan sweet potato, butternut squash, etc.

In addition to being awesome, these are also NUT-free, SOY-free, GLUTEN-free, DAIRY-free, EGG-free, and SUGAR-free.

Coconut-Crusted Yam Tart

Crust
3 Tbsp. coconut oil
1 1/2 c. unsweetened dried coconut

Filling
2 c. yams, mashed
1 c. coconut milk (full fat)
1 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
1/4 tsp. sea salt
2 tsp. orange zest
1 Tbsp. ground flaxseed

  1. Preheat oven to 325.
  2. In a food processor, pulse oil and coconut until thoroughly crushed into the consistancy of sand.
  3. Press crust mixture into a tart pan or muffin cups.

    Golden is good.

  4. Bake for 15-20 mins. Check it near the end to make sure it’s not burning.
  5. Make the filling by mixing flaxseed and coconut milk together in the food processor. Don’t process, just let them sit for 5 mins or so.
  6. Add remaining ingredients and process…. and process… and more processing. The longer it goes the better the texture.
  7. Once the crust is done, pour the filling over the crust and chill (or FREEZE!) until firm.
  8. I topped one batch with some sliced almonds, making it not NUT-free. Toppings are optional, feel free to express yourself.
  9. EAT… NOM NOM NOM NOM.

ALTERNATIVE FILLING ALERT! (AFA for short)

Here's what they look like: White on the outside, purple on the inside.

2 c. hawaiian purple potatoes (aka okinowan sweet potato)
1 c. coconut milk
1 tsp. cardamom
1 1/2 tsp. lime zest
1 tsp. sea salt
1/2 tsp ground ginger

  1. Same directions as above. Expect pretty purple tarts.
  2. Add some zest and shredded coconut for garnish.

    Purpley!!

Roasted Squash and Eggplant with Arugula

1 medium butternut squash, peeled and diced (1/4 inch)
1 eggplant, peeled and diced (1/4 – 1/2 inch)
3 c. fresh arugula
2 Tbsp. melted bacon fat or coconut oil
salt and pepper to taste

  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. In a bowl, coat eggplant and squash with oil and seasonings
  3. Spread onto a baking sheet and roast for 20 mins until the edges are browning.
  4. In a bowl, toss the warm veggies with the arugula until it begins to wilt.
  5. Serve with your favorite entree, like Cilantro-Pistachio Pesto Chicken

    Makes a nice side dish for the winter season.

Work table, courtesy of Craigslist.

Last week we aquired a big wooden work table through an ad on craigslist. While at the owner’s house to pick up the table, I noticed a wall of trees full of banana bunches! As a kid, my dad grew all kinds of tropical plants and I loved eating the tiny sweet bananas that would pop out every once in a while.  Upon questioning, the homeowner informed me that these bananas are a bit more like plantains, you have to cook them in order to eat them. He gave us a big bunch and I promptly fried them up into chips.

If you have never done this, then you should give it a try. Many times, store-bought plantain chips are cooked in a seed oil (sunflower, safflower, etc.) and are laden with omega 6 fatty acids. By frying them yourself, you can ensure a quality fat is used (and they are more yummy, in my opinion).

Here are the steps.

1. cut the peel off the plantain

 

2. It may help to slice down the middle of the peel and go from there.

3. slice plantain into thin-ish slices of equal width.

 

4. Heat up some coconut oil or palm oil in a skillet. Enough to make a pool that will cover the slices once they are placed into the skillet.

5. Once the oil is sizzling hot, leave the burner on a medium-low heat. Drop in the slices and watch them fry!

6. You must keep an eye on them or they will burn! Flip them when you see the bottom starting to turn golden. With a spatula, spoon, etc. remove the done chips from the skillet and let them drain like you would bacon.

7. Stick them in a bowl and season anyway you like! Some ideas: sea salt, cayenne, paprika or coconut sugar and cinnamon.

These are a delicious and healthy, good for sharing and satisfying the “chip” craving.  This method also works for sweet potato, taro, and cassava slices.

Caution: hot oil is dangerous and can cause severe burns. Be careful when placing the slices in the hot oil. Don’t just drop them in, slide them into the oil. Beware while turning and removing the slices as well.

Here we go again! Sorry, no pics from today… but hopefully I’ll get some good ones tomorrow.

8:30 am – green tea

10:30 am – 1/4 papaya, 1/4 c. coconut flakes, and 1 Tbsp. pecan pieces

12 pm – Crossfit! ( I was forced to take a bite of a horrendous macaroon upon arrival… pshhh.)

2 pm – snacked on some walnuts while making a basil-artichoke pesto

2:30 pm – The always delicious skillet. Cabbage, 1/2 beet, 2 mushrooms, 1/2 onion, broccoli slaw, 2 eggs.

3:30 pm – unsweetened chocolate (or as the BF calls them = dirt. I call them delicious)

6 pm – sweet potato chips and blood orange

7:30 pm – 1 can tuna, 1/2 jar TJ’s salsa verde, 1 avocado, 1 cucumber, hot sauce and chili pepper flakes

9 pm – pink lady apple and a handful of almonds

Still a few too many nuts throughout the day but overall I feel pretty good about today’s eats. Papaya in the morning is my new favorite thing. It helps start my day with some good natural enzyme power!

Papaya with Coconut Flakes (this pic was taken in Hawaii!)

Papaya –  a wonderful source of carotenes, anti-oxidants present in orange colored fruits and vegetables. They also contain anti-inflammatory properties such as papain and chymopapai, digestive enzymes which help break down proteins in the digestive process. Papayas also provide immune supporting vitamins such as Vitamin A and C.