Archives for posts with tag: Bacon

Just got back from all my wedding festivities! Spent two weeks away on our honeymoon instead of one and I was quite thankful for the flexibility on our schedules to accommodate such a long vacation.

The new Mister and Missus

Awwwwww!

We stayed in a beach condo for two weeks so I had multiple opportunities to create fun and interesting recipes all day long. Here is the first of many that I will be sharing on this blog.

Add a little side salad and you have a complete meal.

For this recipe, buy all natural and uncured bacon. No nitrates or nitrites added. That stuff is no bueno. Also, go and find a kabocha squash. They are not hard to find and if you’ve never had one, YOU MUST TRY IT! It’s so delicious that my HUSBAND (see how I snuck that in there?!) insists that we always make it when we have visitors because he wants to share his favorite squash with everyone. Here’s what a kabocha looks like.

You can eat the skin too!

Bacon Wrapped Drumsticks with Grilled Kabocha Wedges

5-6 Chicken drumsticks
10-12 slices of bacon (nitrate and nitrite free), about 2 slices per drumstick
1 kabocha squash (also known as a Japanese Pumpkin), seeded and sliced into wedges
2 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted
1 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. red pepper flakes

  1. Light up your grill on medium heat
  2. On a cutting board, wrap the drumstick from top to bottom with bacon strips. Set aside.

    It's like decorating your chicken.

  3. Place kabocha slices in a bowl. Drizzle coconut oil over along with the salt and spices. According to your taste you can make it more salty or more spicy.
  4. Place kabocha on the grill, about 5-6 mins per side depending on the heat of your BBQ. They are done when easily squished or broken. They become quite tender if cooked too long.
  5. Put chicken on the grill and turn halfway through. They should cook about as long as the squash. Be careful for flare ups from the bacon grease dripping into the grill. When the bacon is nice and crispy, take off the grill and serve.

    Crispy and Juicy

Serves 2-3 people

 

 

 

Just a quick little breakfast item.

I like frittatas for multiple reasons:

  1. You can load them with things like meat and veggies.
  2. They are great as leftovers for when you don’t have anytime to cook but you need a quick snack that’s paleo-friendly
  3. You don’t have to flip it like an omlette.

This one started with some caramelized onions and sautéed mushrooms. I used frozen spinach and all natural, nitrate/nitrite free bacon. My cast iron was small so I only used 6 eggs, so if you have a bigger pan, use more.

Bacon, Mushroom, and Spinach Frittata

1/2 lb. bacon
1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
6 crimini mushrooms, sliced
1 c. frozen spinach, thawed and drained
6 eggs
sea salt and pepper to taste
grass-fed butter or bacon grease to oil pan
OPTIONAL: some organic, grass-fed cheddar to top. and avocado

  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. Over medium heat, with some butter begin to caramelized the onions with  the mushrooms until soft.
  3. You may cook the bacon in the same pan or a different one depending on your preference. (I combined  to limit my pan usage). Once cooked, turn off heat and set aside.

    Bacon, onions, and mushrooms

  4. In a medium bowl, whip eggs with some salt and pepper
  5. In a cast iron or oven safe skillet, heat butter over medium heat . Add egg, then spinach and bacon mixture.
  6. Cook over heat for a while until the egg looks half cooked and half runny.

    Pre-oven frittata

  7. Put the skillet in the oven to bake for about 30 mins or until the middle of the frittata is set. To check, just give the pan a shake and its done when it won’t “jiggle” anymore.

Out of the Oven

I recently heard that there is a “cute food” movement brewing right now. Cute food? Well, see picture below.

Aren't they cute?!

So, I decided to put my cute food skills to task and create some animal related tiny foods for us all to OOOOoo and AAAhhh over.

They are bacon and egg cups. While they may not look like animals, they are definitely made out of animals. They are also yummy and a great thing to make in advance if you prefer to run out the door in the morning rather than leisurely chop and sauté omelets and paleo pancakes all morning long.

Nothing much to them, just some bacon and then some egg.

SOAP BOX ALERT:

Okay kids, when purchasing bacon you need to be really sure that it is natural and free from nitrates and nitrites. This is not a difficult thing to determine. Most of the time the package will say NO PRESERVATIVES or ALL NATURAL. But the best way to be sure is to look at the ingredients. SIDE NOTE: While you’re at it, if you are buying any prepackaged food, make sure you read the ingredients. Things (and by “things” I mean “crap that you shouldn’t be eating”) have a way of making their way into any and all packaged food. If the bacon has said preservatives in it, then you must pass on the purchase. Here’s why…

Sodium Nitrate, Potassium Nitrate and Sodium Nitrate all share some common evils:

1. many people have undiscovered sensitivities to these chemicals, symptoms include; migraines, dizziness, nausea, abdominal pain, and difficulty breathing

2. It’s toxic and 1g-2g of sodium nitrate is lethal. It also inhibits your body’s ability to transport oxygen to your bodily tissues.

3. It converts to nitrosamines in the body, which are mutagens that promote cancer growth.

4. Really?! you need 4 reasons. What about 1-3 is not convincing enough?

Seriously guys, this stuff is bad news. So much so that the USDA tried to ban its use in the 1970’s, but (unsurprisingly) this ban met a great amount of opposition by the US meat industry .

Try to find a good local source of uncured natural bacon and pork. Organic… good. preservative-free… good. Trader Joe’s carries some great preservative-free bacon at a great price. Applegate Farms does the same for lots of meat products like bacon, sausages, deli meats (check those labels!)

Final product... unfortunate plates, i know.

Bacon and Egg Cups

bacon, either strips or ends and pieces from Trader Joe’s. enough to cover the bottom and sides of a muffin tin.

eggs, one for each cup

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees

2. Place bacon in muffin tin so that is creates a “holder” for the egg.

making the cup

3. Crack an egg into each cup.

4 Bake for 8-15 mins depending on how thick your bacon is and how runny/well-done you want your egg. 

Variations include:

  • using Canadian bacon rounds instead of bacon
  • putting some sweet potato on the bottom
  • chopping up the bacon and whipping the eggs so that they are more like crustless-quiche.