Archives for category: Seafood

A beautiful morning at my house.

We are definitely creatures of habit. No doubt about it. Even as a chef, I find my household grocery list looking pretty repetitive week to week. This doesn’t happen as much with produce because I like to shop seasonally. For example, during the fall/winter months, hard squashes were always in my reusable totes, but since its turing spring I haven’t bought a squash for a month or so. When it comes to my staples… ground beef, bacon, eggs, coconut milk, etc,  I tend to be very unadventurous.  So every once in a while, I like to purchase something new and different. This past week I picked up some smoked salmon. I LOVE salmon. I usually buy it in frozen steaks but smoked salmon is pretty freaking amazing. When I used to work at trader joe’s, one of my favorite paleo breakfasts during the early shift was a package of smoked salmon and an avocado.

One of my favorite flavor combos!

In remembrance of those days, I recently made a delicious omelette containing those two wonderful items. Healthy fats from all these ingredients, especially the omega 3’s from the wild salmon!

Side note: I also purchased some broccoli, which is a rarity for me. This strikes me as amusing since all I hear from most paleo folks is that they are bored from eating chicken and broccoli all the time. I think to myself, ” How have I managed to sustain paleo cooking for a year without eating broccoli every week?” No joke, I probably have it once or twice in a six month period. So… yeah. I guess that makes me a paleo anomaly.

There's my broccoli!

Salmon and Avocado Omelette

1 oz. smoked coho salmon (from Trader Joes in the beige packaging. It has no sugar added during the smoking process)
2 eggs
1/2 avocado
cooking fat
spices

  1. In a small skillet, melt some coconut oil (good) or bacon fat (better!) over medium heat.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the two eggs and season with black pepper, red pepper flakes, and some garlic powder (I don’t add salt because the salmon is pretty salty).
  3. Pour egg mix in the skillet. Cook one side and flip to cook the other. This takes practice to do without a spatula. Practice by yourself so you don’t embarrass yourself in front of other people. Then, when you are a proficient omelette flipper, invite friends over for breakfast and impress them with your crazy skillz.
  4. As the second side cooks, add your smoked salmon and avocado slices to one side of the egg circle.
  5. Slide onto a plate and  fold over the filling with the empty side of the egg.

See, I told you I like breakfast sandwiches (check my Almond Flour Biscuit post)! This a great alternative to using bread as a vehicle for your food, it’s also another good Paleo breakfast item.

I couldn’t resist trying a new version, especially since it’s nut-free. Nuts and I have a complicated relationship. Actually, I make it complicated. The nuts really hold no blame in this scenario. I tend to have an addictive personality. Okay… okay, not tend. I DO have an addictive personality. I find something I like and I go CRAZY over it. My coconut hiatus last week was an attempt at reigning in that obsession. Unfortunately, when I shut down one obsession, another one starts up. Enter my friend (foe), the NUT.

I found myself going back to my nut dependence that I originally steered away from by introducing more coconut products. Here’s the bottom line: Too much of anything is not good. As a person with life-long digestive problems, nut consumption presents quite an obstacle to “feeling well” in a gastrointestinal context. Not to mention, nuts are relatively high in Omega 6 fats which will sabotage the hallowed Paleo goal of evening out your O3:O6 ratio.

In newbie Paleo-eaters, I almost always hear or see the tendency to over-consume nuts. They are fast, easy and tend to be filling. For me, I could eat nuts until I burst. They really do not make me feel full or satiated… which presents a problem. So my solution is to try not to have nuts around the house. If I do eat them, it’s usually in the form of a “condiment” on salads or in sauces or I will make a dessert-type item OCCASIONALLY (everybody’s favorite diet-related word used to cover up over consumption of questionable items. HEAR YE, HEAR YE! Occasionally means: Not habitual; infrequent).

Yum!

Portobello Breakfast Sandwich

1 large Portobello mushroom, sliced in half like a hamburger bun
1 egg
1 oz. smoked salmon
1/4 avocado, sliced or mashed
1/4 c. sautéed onions
1 Tbsp. melted bacon fat

Remove the stem and gills with a spoon

  1. In a skillet, melt the bacon fat and dip mushroom buns into the oil. Take out ans set aside.
  2. Over low heat, saute onions until soft and a bit caramelized.
  3. Heat up your BBQ grill and over medium heat, grill mushroom halves  until tender.

    Post-grill Portobello

  4. Remove sautéed onion from the skillet and fry up an egg. I like mine a bit runny so this goes pretty fast.
  5. Layer salmon and onions over bottom “bun” add fried egg and avocado and top with the other “bun”.

Taken right before I started Paleo, April 2010

I am an enthusiastic fan of ceviche. First off, I love fish. I grew up in Ventura county, going fishing on the weekends with my family. It’s in my blood. Second, ceviche is fresh and light while being packed with flavor! I love it so much that during my honeymoon, I made two different kinds of ceviche: Tahitian ceviche (aka Poisson Cru, recipe here) and Peruvian ceviche.

Today I will share the Peruvian kind. This meal was inspired by my friend Tina. She’s got a great “mommy” blog and she’s half Peruvian. Enter the ceviche feast! We had a great day at the beach with her new baby, Axel Cruz (how cool is that name?!?!?) and Swedish husband, Johan.

Here’s the beach…

ahhhh... honeymoon.

And here’s the meal. Peruvian ceviche joined by fried plantains and sweet potatoes, grilled vegetables with an avocado sauce, and a raw pear and blackberry tart with a dairy-free caramel sauce. (recipes forthcoming)

paleo disciples... ignore the tortilla chips 😉

Note: If you get a white fish that tends to be parasitic (Cod, for instance), in the interest of health it should be blanched first before marinating in the citrus juice. In traditional ceviche the fish “cooks” in the acid but that is not enough to kill off all parasites, so please take the necessary precautions. Ask your fish guy if you’re unsure.

The Main Event

Peruvian Ceviche

1 lb. fresh fish (suggest grouper, striped sea bass, or halibut!)
1/2 c. lemon juice
1/2 c. lime juice
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp. chopped cilantro
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and diced small
1/2 tsp. sea salt

  1. Cut fish into bite size pieces (larger than a Mexican ceviche).
  2. If blanching, dunk pieces in boiling water for a minute, then drain.
  3. In a shallow dish, combine fish with all other ingredients.
  4. Chill 5 hours, stir once or twice.
  5. Serve with avocado, in cabbage leaves, or over salad… anyway you like.

serves 2-4

Pure Paleo is no easy feat, especially while attending culinary school. I’ve had more grains, legumes, sugar, and dairy beautifully displayed before my eyes (and stomach) three days a week for the past 5 1/2 months. My 80% Primal goals have tumbled to a more lenient 70%… maybe 60% Paleo regime. Unfortunate yes, but also very educational.

I have learned a multitude of reasons to continue to embrace a clean, original human diet vs. following the modern “health” standards. I’ve been faced with the comments and judgement of critics, the constant psychological obstacles, as well as the questions and concerns of the less or mis-informed public. All these things combine into one great learning experience.

While I do not wish to repeat the experience, I do value the knowledge and insights obtained during my brief stay in Santa Cruz and my journey through Chef school.

In an attempt to get back on the wagon, so to speak, I’d like to propose a public rebirth into my Paleo values. It seems like a necessary step, seeing as how I’d like to primarily focus on Paleo cooking as a Paleo Chef. Right now I feel like somewhat of a hypocrite due to unneccessary amounts of neolithic foods in my diet.. not to mention my days as a whole.

In the spirit of renewal and change, I propose an online daily report of my endeavor to return to the Paleo fold. This will most likely include a run-down of my daily Paleo-eats and activities. My attempt at optimum sleep, sunlight, and stress relief. As well as my fight to maintain Paleo composure in the face of all things sugared, flourescent, and unnatural.

So… starting tomorrow, you will see a daily post related to my assimilation back into Paleo heaven. It will not be easy (can you say “sugar withdrawal”?), but it will be worth it. My legitimacy as a Paleo professional hinges on my ability to practice what I preach.

So here we go!

Enjoy the ramblings, as I’m sure there will be many.

Today I was able to share some Paleo food with my class for my final presentation. And even though my final was based on a Gluten-Free condition, I incorporated Paleo recipes into my demonstration.

It seemed to be a successful presentation and I hope you love these dishes as much as I do.

Poisson Cru

2/3 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
1 red onion, finely diced
1 large tomato, seeded and diced.
1 small cucumber, peeled, seeded, and finely diced
2 carrots, finely diced
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 pound sushi-grade ahi tuna, cut into 1/2″ cubes

  1. Set the tuna aside and combine everything else into a large bowl.
  2. Add the tuna and let marinate for 15 minutes.
  3. Drain excess liquid and serve.
    Option: Serve with avocado half.

Recipe by Laird Hamilton, Force of Nature

Poisson Cru and Papaya

Papaya and Cabbage Salad

1 papaya, battoneted
½ head cabbage, shredded
1 tsp. lime zest

  1.  In a bowl combine ingredients and toss with cilantro-lime dressing.

Optional plating: place papaya cuts on top of some shredded cabbage, drizzle dressing and garnish with cilantro leaves.

Cilantro-Lime Dressing

3 limes, juiced
1/3 c. olive oil
1 Tbsp. ground cumin
1 Tbsp. ground coriander
½ tsp. sea salt
½ c. cilantro, chopped

  1. In a blender, combine juice, spices, and cilantro. Slowly add oil to emulsify.

If you’re curious, here’s the handout from my presentation today… enjoy!
Student Handout – Bauman College 2011